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Future of Covid from the perspective of Bangladeshi and other minority communities - 9th January 2022 at 3pm (Zoom Public Meeting)





BritBanglaCovid has organised its first online Zoom meeting since discovery of a new variant of Covid, Omicron. 


 Please register on EventBrite: here


However, regardless of a number of challenges due to beyond the control of minority communities: 


‘'Bangladeshi group was the only ethnic group...the highest vaccine uptake at 91.7%.'’ This is according to the British government's Covid Disparities Report published on 3 December 2021.


We have leaders from health, local and central governments, academic and grassroots members to encourage vaccination and to encourage positive discussion.


SPEAKERS:


Prof Patrick Vernon OBE - Health Campaigner

Rokhsana Fiaz OBE - Mayor of Newham

Rachel Blake - Deputy Mayor of Tower Hamlet Cabinet Member of Adult Health & Well-being.

Chris Tang - Linguistic Education- Kings College London

Shirina Ali - Community Advocacy Manager at Limehouse Project.

Abdi Hassan - Founder of Cafe Afrik CIC


We know there is vaccine hesitation in our communities. We need to learn from others to encourage discussion in a constructive ways to make sure minority lives are saved.


9TH JANUARY 2021 at 3PM


Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81278863853?pwd=TXhid2VGc053NTlUcDJnM2FWc3J6UT09


Meeting ID: 812 7886 3853

Passcode: 960846

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